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1 to 20 of 120 total results.

American Museum of Natural History. Akeley Gallery.

Exist Dates
1971, approximately - present
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened approximately 1971. Located on Floor 2. The Akeley Gallery at the American Museum of Natural History is used for temporary exhibits funded by continuing support from the Arthur Ross Foundation (1, 2001-2003, p. 32; 1, 1974-1975, p. 24, 31; 2, p. 2).

American Museum of Natural History. Akeley Hall of African Mammals.

Exist Dates
1936 - present
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened May 19, 1936. Located on Floor 2, Section 13 and Floor 3, Section 13. The Akeley Hall of African Mammals at the American Museum of Natural History, conceived in 1909 by Carl Akeley (1864-1926), showcases the large mammals of Africa. The hall features a freestanding group of eight elephants and surrounding 28 habitat dioramas on two floors. Each diorama is a recreation of a scene observed by scientists in the field in Africa, photographed, and sketched by accompanying artists in the 1920's and 1930's. Each scene depicts a particular location at a particular time of day (1). Carl Akeley and James L. Clark were the chief taxidermists. Other artists, taxidermists, and preparators included Francis Lee Jacques, Robert Kane, James Perry Wilson, Thomas Hull, George Peterson, Robert Rockwell, Fred Scherer, Charles Bender, Albert E. Butler, Richard Raddatz, Louis Paul Jonas, William R. Leigh, Dudley M. Blakely, Joseph Guerry, George Frederick Mason, and Raymond B. Potter. Early curators included Harold Anthony, T. Donald Carter, and G.H.H. Tate. Martin and Osa Johnson contributed photographic studies for backgrounds. Major donors, expedition members, and financiers were Mary L. Jobe Akeley, William Campbell, George Eastman, C. Oliver O’Donnell, Philip Plant, Daniel Pomeroy, Gertrude, Sidney, Morris Legendre, Daniel B. Wentz, and Arthur S. Vernay (2, 1931, p. 4-6; 2, 1937, p. 61-72; 2, 1941, p. 21; 6, 2006, p. 166). Expeditions which contributed to the hall were the Akeley African Expedition, the Akeley-Eastman-Pomeroy African Hall Expedition (1926), the Carlisle-Clark African Expedition (1928), the Sanford-Patterson-Legendre Abyssinian Expedition (1928-1929), the Davison African Expedition (1933), and the William D. Campbell African Expedition (1936-1937).

American Museum of Natural History. Allen Hall of North American Mammals.

Exist Dates
1904 - 1948
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened approximately 1904 and closed approximately 1946-1948. Located on Floor 2, Section 3. The Allen Hall of North American Mammals featured mounts of North American mammals in display cases. In 1922 the hall was named in honor of J.A. Allen, former mammalogy curator (1, 1922 p. 22). Specimens were collected for the hall on (2, 1902, p. 11, 27; 3, 1904 p. 29-31).

American Museum of Natural History. Anne and Bernard Spitzer Hall of Human Origins.

Exist Dates
2007 - present
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened February 10, 2007. Located on Floor 1, Section 4. The Anne and Bernard Spitzer Hall of Human Origins at the American Museum of Natural History opened as the "cutting edge" successor to the Hall of Human Biology. It is the first exhibition hall in the Museum to incorporate a teaching laboratory, the Sackler Education Laboratory for Comparative Genomics and Human Origins (1, 2007/08, p. 4, 41). The curators were Ian Tattersall of Anthropology and Rob DeSalle of Invertebrate Zoology. The hall covers millions of years of human history, from early ancestors who lived more than six million years ago to modern Homo sapiens, who evolved 200,000 to 150,000 years ago, pairing fossils with DNA research to present the remarkable history of human evolution (2).

American Museum of Natural History. Arthur Ross Hall of Meteorites.

Exist Dates
1976 - present
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened May 21, 1976 and April 30, 1981. Located on Floor 1, Section 6. The Arthur Ross Hall of Meteorites at the American Museum of Natural History opened as part of a three-part exhibition with the Harry Frank Guggenheim Hall of Minerals and the Morgan Memorial Hall of Gems on May 21, 1976 (1, 1975/76, p. 20). The hall was under construction again for two years and reopened on April 30, 1981 (1, 1980/81, p. 49) The hall was completely renovated and updated in 2001 (1, 2001/03, p. 7). The curator of the hall and meteorite collection, Department of Mineral Sciences chairman Martin Prinz, worked with D. Vincent Manson who served as consultant, and Albert Woods of design firm Ramirez and Woods. The hall is named in honor of Museum trustee and benefactor of the hall, Arthur Ross (1, 1975/76 p. 20; 1, 1980/81 p. 29).

American Museum of Natural History. Audubon Gallery.

Exist Dates
1913 - present
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened approximately 1913. Located on Floor 3, Section WC from 1913 to approximately 1939 and on Floor 4, Section 12a from approximately 1943. The Audubon Gallery at the American Museum of Natural History featured objects relating to the life of John James Audubon, including original sketches and paintings by Audubon and his sons John Woodhouse and Victor, illustrations from the Quadrupeds of North America, copper plates from the Birds of North America, a portrait of Robert Havell, engraver and publisher of Audubon's Birds of America, a gun carried by Audubon on many of his expeditions, and his buckskin hunting coat (1, 1913, p. 76; 1, 1916, p. 83; 1, 1918, p. 83). In 1939, the gallery was located on the landing between the second and third floors while being transferred to a new location. By 1943 it had moved to the fourth floor of the Roosevelt Wing (1, 1939, p. 97; 1, 194,3 p. 88). Most of the objects were donated by Audubon's granddaughters, Maria R. and Florence Audubon. Other objects were donated by M. Eliza Audubon, Dr. Edward H. Rogers, Anna E. Roelker, and Robert Havell Lockwood (1, 1913, p. 76; 1, 1919, p. 86). The gallery appears on the Museum's 2016 Floor Plan, but has been closed to the public as of 2017.

American Museum of Natural History. Bashford Dean Hall of Fossil Fishes.

Exist Dates
1929 - 1952
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened June 10, 1929 and closed approximately 1950-1952. Located on Floor 4, Section 5. The Bashford Dean Hall of Fossil Fishes at the American Museum of Natural History was located in the tower room adjoining the Hall of Fossil Reptiles. Curators included Bashford Dean and William K. Gregory (1, 1929, p. 20; 1, 1936 p. 11-12).

American Museum of Natural History. Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals.

Exist Dates
1942 - present
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened April 8, 1942. Located on Floor 1, Section 13. The Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals at the American Museum of Natural History features habitat dioramas of mammal species with each diorama depicting a particular time of year and day in specific North American locations (1, 1967). The hall was completed in 1954, 12 years following its opening in 1942. Additional dioramas of smaller species of North American Mammals can be found in the adjacent Hall of Small Mammals. The hall underwent one refurbishment in the 1980s (2, 1981/82, p. 48; 2, 1984/85, p. 52) and a major restoration in 2012 along with the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall (3). More than 25 Museum expeditions contributed to the hall, including the James Perry Wilson Expedition to Wyoming (1938) (4, 2001, p. 26). The original curator for the hall was Harold Anthony; artists for the dioramas included George Adams, Belmore Browne, James L. Clark, Albert E. Butler, James Carmel, Gardell Christensen, Raymond deLucia, Joseph Guerry, George Frederick Mason, George Petersen, Robert Rockwell, Carl Rungius, Charles Tornell, James Perry Wilson, and Paul M. Wright. Major donors and expedition financiers included Harold Clark, Harry P. Davison, Wilton Lloyd Smith, Robert McConnell, Richard K. Mellon, Harvey S. Mudd, and Beverly R. Robinson (6; 7, 2006, p. 167-168) .

American Museum of Natural History. Bird Art Gallery.

Exist Dates
1939 - 1953
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened June 6, 1939 and closed approximately 1949-1953. Located on Floor 4, Section 19. The Bird Art Gallery at the American Museum of Natural History exhibited paintings of birds. It was part of three halls in the Whitney Wing, which formally opened to the public on June 6, 1939 and included the Sanford Memorial Hall of the Biology of Birds and the Whitney Memorial Hall of Oceanic Birds (1, 1939, p. 8).

American Museum of Natural History. Building Stones (Exhibit)

Exist Dates
1913 - 1937
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened approximately 1913 and closed 1937. Located on Floor 1, Section NC (North Corridor). The Building Stones (Exhibit) at the American Museum of Natural History exhibited building stones of marble, sandstone, limestone, dolomite, quartzite, slate, granite, diabase, soapstone. Other exhibits illustrated the products derived from coal; minerals and ores from Broken Hill, Australia; a collection of gypsum; typical American and Manhattan Island rocks, local peat; and a varied assortment of marbles from Italy, Alaska, Canada, and the United States with large representations from New York and Vermont. The hall also included a large number of specimens representing various phases of general geology (1, 1935, p. 40-41). The Museum received the collection of building stones in 1886 (2, 1886, p. 12-13), which was previously displayed as the Jesup Collection of Building Stones in the east corridor of the first floor circa 1904 (GG 1904 p. 39). Sharing space with the Eskimo collection and meteorites on the first floor, the collection of building stones became part of the Hall of Petrology in 1937 (2, 1937, p.12).

American Museum of Natural History. Chinese and Siberian Collections (Hall)

Exist Dates
1911 - 1963
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened approximately 1911 and closed approximately 1962-1963. Located on Floor 3, Section 6. The first documentation of the Chinese and Siberian Collections at the American Museum of Natural History is in the 1911 General Guide (1, 1911, p. 69) and the last is in the 1962 or 1963 General Guide (1, 1962, p. 10, 13, 32). The hall, originally curated by Berthold Laufer with financial support from Jacob H. Schiff and other members of the East Asiatic Committee, (2, 1913, p. 67) featured Asian ethnology collections and was arranged geographically. The hall was regularly updated and went through rearrangements in 1917 and in the late 1930’s (2, 1917, p. 46; 2, 1937, p. 18). The Drummond Collection of Jade, related in theme to the Chinese and Siberian Collections, was exhibited in the tower off the South Sea Island Hall (1, 1943, p. 162).

American Museum of Natural History. Collections from the Philippine Islands.

Exist Dates
1909 - 1961
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened 1909 and closed between 1958-1961. Located on Floor 4, Section 8. The Collections from the Philippine Islands at the American Museum of Natural History was an ethnology hall installed in the newly built West Wing in 1909-1910. (1, 1910, p. 16) It was mainly devoted to the Philippines, but also housed collections from Malaysia and Java (2, 1911, p. 93; 2, 1920, p. 122). The collection was reinstalled in 1918 by A.L. Kroeber, L.R. Sullivan, and William A. Sabine (1, 1918, p. 86). The last documentation of this hall is in the 1958 General Guide (5, 1958, p. 199).

American Museum of Natural History. Corner Gallery.

Exist Dates
1946 - 1976
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened 1946-1947 and closed approximately 1976. Located on Floor 2, Section 5 from 1946 to 1973-1974 and on Floor 4 from 1973-1974 to approximately 1976. The Corner Gallery at the American Museum of Natural History was a space for temporary exhibits. It originally shared a space with the North Asiatic Mammal Hall on the second floor, where space was available in an unused section (1, 1947, p. 113). The Corner Gallery was remodeled in 1971 as a slide projection theater, then relocated to the fourth floor in 1973-1974 (2, 1971-1972, p. 37-37; 1973-1974, p. 32). The latest documentation of the Corner Gallery is a Museum press release from May 1976 (3, 1976).

American Museum of Natural History. Darwin Hall.

Exist Dates
1904 - 1952
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened approximately 1904 and closed approximately 1950-1952. Located on Floor 1, Section 5. The Darwin Hall at the American Museum of Natural History was primarily devoted to invertebrate zoology, relationships between various groups of animals, and the evolution of life. On February 12, 1909, the 100th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin and the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Origin of the Species, the hall was rededicated by the Trustees as the Darwin Hall of Invertebrate Zoology (1, 1906, p. 26). Curators and artists for the Darwin Hall included Roy W. Miner, Henry Edward Crampton, George H. Childs, B.E. Dahlgren, Show Shimotori, Chris E. Olson, Herman O. Mueller, Ignaz Matausuch, Worthington H. Southwick, L.W. Williams, and Janet Smedley (1, 1906, p. 22; 1, 1913, p. 63; 1, 1917, p. 70; 1, 1920, p. 75; 1, 1929, p. 60; 1, 1936, p. 9).

American Museum of Natural History. Eskimo Hall.

Exist Dates
1896 - 1999
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened 1896 and closed 1999. Located on Floor 1, Section NC as the north corridor of the Hall of Northwest Coast Indians from 1896-1916 and on Floor 1, Section 7a from 1916 to 1999 (1, 1998; 1, 1999). The Eskimo Hall at the American Museum of Natural History highlighted traditional Eskimo (Inuit) cultures in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Alaska, Canada, and Greenland and their ability to survive and thrive in the harshest environments (2, 1972, p. 137; 3, 1984, p. 42). When the Eskimo Hall was exhibited at the rear of the Hall of Northwest Coast Indians, it featured murals by Frank Wilbert Stokes which were financially supported by Arthur Curtiss James (4, 1906, p. 19). Material for the hall was contributed by the Stefansson-Anderson and Crocker Land Expeditions (4, 1919, p. 99). Expedition members of the Crocker Land Expedition included Robert Peary, George Comer, and Donald MacMillan (5, 1919 p. 15). As part of the Museum's ten-year exhibition expansion program, the hall was redeveloped by curator Stanley Freed and reopened on March 5, 1965 (2, 1964-1965, p. 28-29).

American Museum of Natural History. Evelyn Miles Keller Memorial Exhibit.

Exist Dates
1964 - present
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened March 24, 1964. Located on Floor 1, Section WC. The Evelyn Miles Keller Memorial Exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History was a gift of Dr. Franklin J. Keller and consists of 200 shells collected by his wife, Evelyn Miles Keller (1, 1976). The shell exhibition shares the same corridor as Mollusks of New York State. Exhibition preparation was supervised by William K. Emerson and William E. Old, Jr of the Department of Invertebrate Zoology (2, 1963-1964, p. 39).

American Museum of Natural History. Felix M. Warburg Memorial Hall of New York State Environment.

Exist Dates
1951 - present
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened 1951. Located on the First Floor, Section 3. Planning and construction began in 1948 along with the Hall of North American Forests and a planned but never completed Botany Hall (1, 1948-1949, p. 10). The Felix M. Warburg Memorial Hall of New York State Environment at the American Museum of Natural History covers humans’ relationship to nature, using nearby Dutchess County as a study. The hall was dedicated in memory of Trustee Frederick “Felix” Warburg (1, 1949-1950, p. 5). Farida A. Wiley of the Department of Public Instruction was consulted on the hall’s development (1, 1955-1956, p. 27).

American Museum of Natural History. Fishes (Exhibit)

Exist Dates
1926 - 1926
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Open approximately 1926. Located on Floor 1, Section CCP (Corridor of Central Pavilion). Fishes (Exhibit) at the American Museum of Natural History contained exhibits on or of paddlefish, sharks, ocean sunfish, and luminous fishes of the sea (1, 1926, p. 37).

American Museum of Natural History. Fossil Fish Hall.

Exist Dates
approximately 1909 - approximately 1928
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened approximately 1909 and closed approximately 1928. Located Floor 4, Section 5. The Fossil Fish Hall at the American Museum of Natural History was located in the tower room adjoining the Hall of Fossil Reptiles. The curator for the hall was Bashford Dean (1, 1928, p. 46).

American Museum of Natural History. Gallery 1.

Exist Dates
1983 - 1989
Abstract
Permanent exhibition. Opened April 1983 and closed approximately 1988-1989. Located on Floor 1, Section 4. Gallery 1 at the American Museum of Natural History was a space for temporary exhibits. It closed to accommodate the expansion of the Hall of Human Biology and Evolution (1, 1983-1984, p. [0]; 1, 1988-1989, p. 45).
1 to 20 of 120 total results.